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Saturday News – the conversation pie, Spring for Poets and Gibert Jeune

March 20, 2021 19 comments

I don’t know how it is in your corner of the world but in mine, as we’re marking the anniversary of the first lockdown, theatres, cinemas, museums, bars, restaurants and shopping malls are still closed. Basically, the only remaining hobbies are cooking, reading, blogging, watching films at home, playing board games (try Pandemic, very timely and terribly realistic), running, biking and hiking. Yay. I’m still very very thankful for my unconditional love for books and my blogging activities.

Tarte conversation from Culture Crunch ©

Among the authorized activities is visiting local shops and indulging in food goodies. This is how I came across the conversation pie and its literary history. It was created in 1774 and named after the book Les conversations d’Emilie by Madame d’Epinay

She was Grimm’s lover and friend with Rousseau, Diderot and Voltaire. (Yes, imagine that.) Madame d’Epinay wrote this book of conversations with her granddaughter Emilie as a guidebook for the education of girls. She and Rousseau had long discussions about education in general and she thought something was missing regarding girls’ education.

Her book was such a success that this conversation pie was invented. The recipe is here (and in English) if you’re curious. I’ve bought one is a bakery and it’s good. Of course, after that, you need to exercise to burn all those calories but lucky you, running, biking and hiking are authorized activities. So, All is best in the best of all possible worlds., right?

Today is the first day of spring and we’re in the middle of the Printemps des Poètes or Spring for Poets. (13-29 March). It’s an event dedicated to poetry and this year’s theme is Desire. It reminded me that I ought to read more poetry. After diving into the biography of Berthe Morisot who was such good friends with Stéphane Mallarmé that he became her daughter’s guardian after she died, I thought I’d give his poetry a try.

Full of optimism, I downloaded a collection of his most famous poems. Phew!… Granted, I’m not a great reader of poetry but clearly, Mallarmé is out of my reach. Some of his poems like Le Guignon don’t make any sense to me. I know the words but I don’t know what to do with the way he puts them together. *sigh* So much for improving my reading of poetry.

Photo from Wikipedia

This week also came with sad news. Although the government took some measures to protect bookstores from the pandemic storm, the famous bookshop Gibert Jeune didn’t survive. Set in the Quartier Latin in Paris since 1886, Gibert Jeune closed down their four shops in Place St Michel. Lots of famous writers haunted the alleys of this book temple. 

Although I’m not from Paris, I have fond memories of going to Gibert Jeune to buy school books during the summer for the upcoming school year. This is where my mother got me my Gaffiot, the French-Latin dictionary we use in class and other books to prepare exams. It was the biggest bookstore I’d ever been into and I loved browsing through the shelves. I wonder what store will be in their place, I hope it’s not another luxury clothes, beauty or telephone store.

Apart from these random news, I’m starting a new job in a couple of weeks, I expect to be very busy in the upcoming months. I hope I’ll have enough time to keep up with billets and reading your reviews.

How is it going for you at the moment? 

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