Home > 1960, 20th Century, Australian Literature, Cook Kenneth, Highly Recommended, Made into a film, Noir, Novella > Wake in Fright by Kenneth Cook – What happens in The Yabba must stay in The Yabba

Wake in Fright by Kenneth Cook – What happens in The Yabba must stay in The Yabba

December 12, 2018 Leave a comment Go to comments

Wake in Fright by Kenneth Cook (1961) French title: Cinq matins de trop.

Welcome to our next stop on my crime fiction reading journey. We’re with John Grant, a schoolteacher who has been appointed in the remote tiny town of Tiboonda in the Australian outback. He hates it there and he still has another year to serve but now it’s the end of the school year and he’s on his way back to civilisation, which means Sydney to him.

The schoolteacher knew that somewhere not far out in the shimmering haze was the state border, marked by a broken fence, and that further out in the heat was the silent centre of Australia, the Dead Heart. He looked through the windows almost with pleasure, because tonight he would be on his way to Bundanyabba; tomorrow morning he would board an aircraft; and tomorrow night he would be in Sydney, and on Sunday he would swim in the sea. For the schoolteacher was a coastal Australian, a native of the strip of continent lying between the Pacific Ocean and the Great Dividing Range, where Nature deposited the graces she so firmly withheld from the west.

He has to stay in the mining town of Bundanyabba for a night to catch his flight. It’s hot as hell in this place in the summer. After checking in in his hotel room, he decides to have a beer in a pub before going to bed. He starts chatting with a policeman who takes him to the local two-up gambling game. Grant is fascinated by the show, the bets, the atmosphere. He leaves unscathed but is caught by the gambling bug later in the night. He goes back and of course, he loses all his money. He’s now stranded in Bundanyabba, or as the locals call it, The Yabba.

What the loss meant to him was so grievous in import that he could not think about it. His mind had a small tight knot at the back, and around it whirled the destructive realisation of what he had done, but until that knot unravelled, he need not think too deeply about what was to happen now. He went back to the hotel, stripped off his clothes, fell naked on to the bed, and stared, hot-eyed, at the ceiling until suddenly he fell asleep with the light still burning.

The morning after, he wanders in town, enters another pub and befriends with Hynes, the director of the local mine. Hynes takes him home to diner with his wife, adult daughter and friends Dick and Joe. They drink themselves into a stupor and Grant wakes up in a shack which is the home of the local Doc. Grant barely recovers sobriety before drinking again and being dragged into a nightly kangaroo hunt.

How will he get out his predicament?

No wonder Wake in Fright has become a classic. Cook draws the tale of a man who’s in a two-years hiatus from his life as he has to serve his two years in the Australian outback and he loathes it. He’s bored, ill-prepared for the climate and so ready to have a break from it all during the Christmas six weeks holidays.

He’s puzzled by the bush and its people. All the people he meets in The Yabba love it there, something he can’t understand. The heat turns his brain into mush, thirst leads to drinking too much beer and his willpower is quickly eroded and crumbles. The poor, candid and virgin John Grant is taken in a storm of drinking and sex topped up by a hallucinating hunting trip in the wild.

Cook draws a convincing picture of life in the outback. He brings the reader there, especially in the descriptions of the landscape and wild life. Like here when Grant is in a truck on his way to the hunting trip:

Out over the desert plains, behind the roar and grind of the ancient engines, the dreary words and trite tunes of modern America caused the dingoes to cock their ears in wonder, and deepened measurably the sadness that permeates the outback of Australia.

I imagine them all in the truck’s cabin, listening to the only radio available and disturbing the peace of the wildlife with their loud Western attitude. Meanwhile, nature goes on with its natural course and gives us humans a magnificent show.

Eventually the sun relinquished its torturing hold and the plains became brown and purple and gold and then black as the sky was pierced by a million bursts of flickering light from dispassionate worlds unthinkable distances apart.

Wake in Fright has a strong sense of place, The Yabba is almost a character, playing a decisive role in the days Grant will spend in this dreary place. The book is tagged as psychological thriller, probably because Grant falls into the sick hands of the Hynes clique. Moral compasses are not aligned between Sydney and The Yabba. Propriety is not the same and Grant is a stranger with no clue of the code of conduct he should abide by.

Peculiar trait of the western people, thought Grant, that you could sleep with their wives, despoil their daughters, sponge on them, defraud them, do almost anything that would mean at least ostracism in normal society, and they would barely seem to notice it. But refuse to drink with them and you immediately became a mortal enemy. What the hell?

I’m not so sure about the psychological thriller tag. Sure, Grant falls victim to a group of sickos. But he had opportunities to opt out of this destructive journey. He knew he should not go back to the gambling game. Yet he did. He could have looked for Crawford and ask for help at the police station. Yet he didn’t. Cook doesn’t let us see Grant as a victim, except of his own weakness as he writes:

He almost smiled at the enormous absurdity of it all. But what was so fantastic was that there had been no element of necessity about it all. It was as though he had deliberately set about destroying himself; and yet one thing had seemed to lead to the next.

Wake in Fright is a hell of a ride with a man unconsciously led to self-destruction in the hard environment of a small outback town in Australia. In a way, Grant is a bit like Meursault, the main character of L’Etranger by Albert Camus. Both have their mind altered by heat and live moments of their lives as in a daze, not willing to engage with life, probably unable to find a proper meaning to it all.

Kenneth cooks us a stunning and memorable story of a man left in a harsh environment whose codes he fails to understand. A man not sure enough of who he is and where he stands in the world to resist the destructive forces of The Yabba.

Highly recommended.

  1. December 12, 2018 at 11:07 am

    Love “Kenneth cooks us”! I wonder if Wake in Fright is regarded as a psychological thriller because that is how the film – which is much better known than the book – renders it. I often travel through ‘Bundanyabba’ (Broken Hill), it’s certainly desolate country, and I’m not sure I’d want to get in with shooters, they have the fiercest dogs.

    Like

    • December 12, 2018 at 3:40 pm

      I haven’t seen the movie and I’m not sure I want to see this kangaroo hunt party on film.
      Of all the readers of this blog, only you could know what Bundanyabba is in real life.
      It must have been something, in the 1950s, 1960s.
      I’d love to read your thoughts about Wake in Fright.

      Like

  2. December 12, 2018 at 1:01 pm

    I remember reading this when I was a student at teachers’ college, and I was petrified that I would be sent to work in some awful remote place after I graduated!

    Like

    • December 12, 2018 at 3:44 pm

      I can imagine that very well.
      I understood that Grant had to work there to pay off something to the government. Was there a program of “free education” against mandatory service as a teacher for a few years? It sounded like this.
      PS: it’s also pre-AUD and metric system. It’s strange.

      Like

      • December 12, 2018 at 11:41 pm

        I don’t know how it worked in other states, but there used to be a system of studentships, which gave the student a living allowance and paid for tertiary fees for teachers, on condition that the teacher then taught for a period of up to 3 schools, often in hard-to-staff places. It was brought in during a period of teacher shortages and also when university fees were too expensive for most people. But by the time I got one, studentships had been abolished because there was a glut of teachers – and then brought back in again because the few graduates who got jobs were going to the private schools. I won one of 25 awarded in the state and I was the only one in my year who got a job in a government school.

        Like

        • December 16, 2018 at 9:02 am

          That’s probably what Cook refers to.

          There used to be a similar system here too with the Ecole Normale, a network of schools for teachers accross France.

          Liked by 1 person

    • December 12, 2018 at 6:56 pm

      Hey Lisa, (Australian writer) Mary Gilmore’s first school was Silverton, outside Broken Hill, in 1899. Nothing in Victoria would be that bad! Though I don’t think she felt it as badly as Cook’s Grant.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. January 3, 2019 at 6:32 pm

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